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Materne & Schmitt Riesling Trocken Wunschkind 2018 750ml

size
750ml
country
Germany
VM
90
Additional vintages
2020 2018
VM
90
Rated 90 by Vinous Media
This bottling is less widely sourced than its 2017 predecessor, as there was more estate wine available to utilize. And unlike its vintage 2017 counterpart, this 2018 is not bone dry – in fact, it isn’t quite legally trocken – yet weighs in at a full percentage point more alcohol. It was only bottled at the beginning of September 2019, along with the majority of the estate’s village- and vineyard-designated offerings. There is a brightness here that many wines from the Middle Mosel and Saar from this vintage cannot claim – a surprising and felicitous result for the Lower (“Terrassen“) Mosel and one that Schmitt explained not just in terms of early harvest, but also by her having dispensed with the estate’s usual pre-fermentative skin contact. But at the same time, there is a lush midpalate and a caressing textural softness running parallel to the expression of juicy, coolingly fennel- and thyme-tinged apple and honeydew melon. Surprising, too, is the sense of lift on the lusciously lingering, mouthwateringly salt-tinged finish. Here, we’re back to the incredible quality/price rapport of the vintage 2015 Wunschkind. ... More details
Image of bottle
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Materne & Schmitt Riesling Trocken Wunschkind 2018 750ml

SKU 860585
$17.94
/750ml bottle
Quantity
* This item is available for online ordering only. It can be picked up or shipped from our location within 4-6 business days. ?
Professional Ratings
VM
90
VM
90
Rated 90 by Vinous Media
This bottling is less widely sourced than its 2017 predecessor, as there was more estate wine available to utilize. And unlike its vintage 2017 counterpart, this 2018 is not bone dry – in fact, it isn’t quite legally trocken – yet weighs in at a full percentage point more alcohol. It was only bottled at the beginning of September 2019, along with the majority of the estate’s village- and vineyard-designated offerings. There is a brightness here that many wines from the Middle Mosel and Saar from this vintage cannot claim – a surprising and felicitous result for the Lower (“Terrassen“) Mosel and one that Schmitt explained not just in terms of early harvest, but also by her having dispensed with the estate’s usual pre-fermentative skin contact. But at the same time, there is a lush midpalate and a caressing textural softness running parallel to the expression of juicy, coolingly fennel- and thyme-tinged apple and honeydew melon. Surprising, too, is the sense of lift on the lusciously lingering, mouthwateringly salt-tinged finish. Here, we’re back to the incredible quality/price rapport of the vintage 2015 Wunschkind.
Winery
“Wunschkind” or “wish child” is the name for Materne & Schmitts first wine, and refers to Rebecca and Janina's greatest wish: to own a winery. The grapes for this wine are from a combination of all three villages (Winningen, Kobern, and Lehmen) in their portfolio. All vineyards are steep slopes or terraced vineyards and all from slate. One could say this is a Terrassen Mosel cuvée. Four to eight hour maceration on skins, natural settling by gravity, spontaneous fermentation, no chaptalization, no fining, no additions or reductions of any kind. The wine develops 11 months on the lees in stainless steel tanks; filtered and sulphured minimally before bottling.
Product Details
size
750ml
country
Germany
Additional vintages
2020 2018
Overview
Rated 90 - This bottling is less widely sourced than its 2017 predecessor, as there was more estate wine available to utilize. And unlike its vintage 2017 counterpart, this 2018 is not bone dry – in fact, it isn’t quite legally trocken – yet weighs in at a full percentage point more alcohol. It was only bottled at the beginning of September 2019, along with the majority of the estate’s village- and vineyard-designated offerings. There is a brightness here that many wines from the Middle Mosel and Saar from this vintage cannot claim – a surprising and felicitous result for the Lower (“Terrassen“) Mosel and one that Schmitt explained not just in terms of early harvest, but also by her having dispensed with the estate’s usual pre-fermentative skin contact. But at the same time, there is a lush midpalate and a caressing textural softness running parallel to the expression of juicy, coolingly fennel- and thyme-tinged apple and honeydew melon. Surprising, too, is the sense of lift on the lusciously lingering, mouthwateringly salt-tinged finish. Here, we’re back to the incredible quality/price rapport of the vintage 2015 Wunschkind.
green grapes

Varietal: Riesling

Riesling grapes have produced some of the finest wines of the Old World over the past couple of centuries, and are quickly becoming much loved by New World audiences as their influence continues to spread across the globe. They are generally grown and cultivated in colder climates, as is found in their native Germany, where they have the remarkable ability to pick up and express interesting features of their terroir, or the ground on which they are grown. As such, wine enthusiasts generally find Riesling one of the more interesting white grape varietals, as they produce aromas which are highly floral and perfumed alongside both fruit flavors and refreshing notes of stone and alpine water, depending on where they have been grown. Furthermore, Riesling grapes produce a large variety of fine wines, from still to sparkling, sweet to dry, and wineries which work with this grape have long since been experimenting with both frozen and rotten grapes to find out just how versatile and exciting this varietal can be.
fields

Country: Germany

If German wine has had something of a bad reputation in the past, it may well be the fault of the fact that for a long time now, the Germans have simply kept all the best produce to themselves. Visit any town or village in wine producing regions of Germany, and you'll be faced with a stunning array of extremely high quality wines, each matched with local dishes and full of distinct character and flavor. As white wine production makes up for about two-thirds of all Germany's wine industry, this is by far the most visible and widely enjoyed type of wine, but one should not overlook the quality and range of rosé and red wines on offer from this fascinating country. In particular, the Spatburgunder wines (the German name for Pinot Noir) are generally of an exceptionally high quality, being full of dark, intense hedgerow fruit flavors and exciting spicy notes with a silky smooth finish.
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More Details
green grapes

Varietal: Riesling

Riesling grapes have produced some of the finest wines of the Old World over the past couple of centuries, and are quickly becoming much loved by New World audiences as their influence continues to spread across the globe. They are generally grown and cultivated in colder climates, as is found in their native Germany, where they have the remarkable ability to pick up and express interesting features of their terroir, or the ground on which they are grown. As such, wine enthusiasts generally find Riesling one of the more interesting white grape varietals, as they produce aromas which are highly floral and perfumed alongside both fruit flavors and refreshing notes of stone and alpine water, depending on where they have been grown. Furthermore, Riesling grapes produce a large variety of fine wines, from still to sparkling, sweet to dry, and wineries which work with this grape have long since been experimenting with both frozen and rotten grapes to find out just how versatile and exciting this varietal can be.
fields

Country: Germany

If German wine has had something of a bad reputation in the past, it may well be the fault of the fact that for a long time now, the Germans have simply kept all the best produce to themselves. Visit any town or village in wine producing regions of Germany, and you'll be faced with a stunning array of extremely high quality wines, each matched with local dishes and full of distinct character and flavor. As white wine production makes up for about two-thirds of all Germany's wine industry, this is by far the most visible and widely enjoyed type of wine, but one should not overlook the quality and range of rosé and red wines on offer from this fascinating country. In particular, the Spatburgunder wines (the German name for Pinot Noir) are generally of an exceptionally high quality, being full of dark, intense hedgerow fruit flavors and exciting spicy notes with a silky smooth finish.